FACUA reports Apple for Macbook Pro design fault which costs over 500 euros to fix

Models from 2016 and newer feature a cable connected to the screen, which is worn away a little each time the laptop is opened and closed, and can end up breaking altogether. The only way to fix the problem is to replace the entire monitor.

FACUA reports Apple for Macbook Pro design fault which costs over 500 euros to fix

FACUA-Consumers in Action have reported Apple Retail Spain SL, Apple's Spanish subsidiary, to the Community of Madrid's Department of Trade and Consumer Affairs, for a design fault in Macbook Pro post-2016 models which costs 600 dollars (over 500 euros) to fix.

As various media outlets have revealed, Macbook Pro models from 2016 and newer feature a cable connected to the screen, which is prone to wear and tear at the points it passes beneath the hinges connecting the screen to the rest of the device each time the laptop is opened and closed, which can lead to the cable breaking altogether.

Due to a decision made by the company’s design team, replacing this cable, which would cost only around 5 euros, is impossible due to the way in which it's connected. As a result, the whole screen has to be replaced in order to fit a new cable, which brings repair costs up to over 500 euros.

FACUA believes that Apple could be committing a case of unfair commercial practice, since the existence of this design fault in the Macbook Pro benefits the company not only in terms of generating revenue from sales of the models, but also from their repair.

The association stresses that Spain's Unfair Competition Act deems "unfair by misleading, any conduct which contains false information or information which, despite being truthful, misleads or could mislead recipients due to its content or presentation", which includes "the need for a service or part, replacement or repair".

Similarly, the Community of Madrid’s 11/1988 Consumer Protection Law, the Community being home to Apple Retail Spain SL's head offices, deems "unfair commercial practice with consumers" an infraction, "as established in applicable legislation".

What’s more, FACUA states that such conduct could pose a serious threat to customers’ economic interest, due to high repair costs, bearing in mind that this is a defect which could arise in all the devices.

The association therefore believes that this offence could come to be considered very serious. As laid out in article 53.1 of the 11/1988 Law, the fine for violating this law is set at up to 600,000 euros, and may exceed that amount up to a limit of five times the value of the products concerned.