FACUA joins the feminist mobilisation and calls women to participate in the actions organised for the 8 of March

The association encourages consumers not to buy anything that is not essential as part of the consumer strike organised for the Women's International Day.

FACUA joins the feminist mobilisation and calls women to participate in the actions organised for the 8 of March
FACUA Seville members during the 2018 Women's International Day.

FACUA-Consumers in Action joins the feminist mobilisation and calls women to participate in the actions organised for the 8th of March to fight for female rights. The association is releasing a Manifesto Today to support the strike organised for this Women's International Day. This year, the strike has four focuses: Education, Labour, Consumption and Care. As a part of the protests and the consumer strike, FACUA encourages consumers not to buy anything that is not essential this 8th of March.

'Join 8M: FACUA defends female rights' Manifesto

One more year, FACUA supports the feminist mobilisation for the 8th of March and calls society to participate in the different events, protests and actions organised for the Women's International Day, that this year has four focuses: Education, Labour, Consumption and Care. It intends to raise awareness about the struggle against structural inequality in current society between men and women, the growing feminisation of poverty, the violence against women and the commercial use of the female body in a consumer society that contributes to deepening the existing gender gap.

8M must be a day of action and also to think over the current social and economic model and its direct consequences on women's lives. This is why FACUA calls citizens to act and their actions to imply reducing consumption to essentials. 2019 actions in Spain are part of a diverse international movement that aims to face the patriarchal system and the predatory economy which preys on those groups which are in a situation of greater vulnerability and lack of protection. FACUA stands for a different social organisation, in which people and their rights are in the centre.

FACUA joins the feminist fight and therefore commits to the elimination of women's labour, economic and social discrimination, a discrimination that makes much of their work invisible. The association considers it essential that the State, and society as a whole, recognize the role of women and establish a real support network.

FACUA also condemns the gender consumption of the market, that objectifies women and uses their body and looks as a decoy to sell products and services. The association defends the elimination of the gender distinction of many products that makes them more expensive when they are targeted to women, and the stereotypes that branches and superstores give to certain female activities, that must be overcome in an advance society as the current society is.

It is essential that institutions and the society as a whole work to eradicate the sexist practices of the economic system which strengthen inequality and prey against the dignity of women.

FACUA also claims that administrations join the fight for women's rights and therefore apply exemplary sanctions against those companies that prey against women's rights.

Citizens' representatives must commit to eradicate inequality and decide which bodies are responsible of correcting those market misuses, since currently none of them enforce the General Law of Advertising regarding the gender issues or the Law for Comprehensive Protection Measures against Gender Violence which includes the prohibition of sexist advertising.

FACUA finds essential to report those behaviours that imply gender discrimination and therefore keeps vigilant on those market practices threatening the dignity of women. The association also demands preventive measures to put an end to those practices and let a higher participation of women in all public and private fields and. These measures must include global aspects of access of women to those spaces where there is still inequality, but also everyday issues regarding labour, society, family and consumer relations.